Nexturn SA-32PYII Swiss-Style Lathe

Contact Details

Absolute Machine Tools
Address
7420 Industrial Parkway
Lorain
44053
Ohio
United States
Phone
440-960-6911
Toll Free Phone
800-852-7825

41.4094131, -82.276406

June 12,2018
Nexturn SA-32PYII Swiss-Style Lathe

The Nexturn SA-32PYII Swiss-style lathe is a 32mm machine that comes standard with an exchangeable rotary synchronous guide bushing. This new model allows changeover from guide bushing to non-guide bushing depending on the application and material. Changing to non-guide bushing mode allows for the use of less expensive non-ground material and greatly reduces remnant length, saving material costs.

The lathe features up to 8 total axes (Z1, X1, Y1, Z2, X2, Y2, C1, C2) and up to 25 total tools. Machining capacity is 32mm on the main and sub-spindle, and 210mm (8”) maximum turning length with guide bushing and 60mm (2.36”) without the guide bushing. Nexturn Swiss machines use FANUC controls.

The machine is built for rigidity, accuracy, reliability, and ease of use. The highly rigid one-piece cast iron machine bed is designed using FEM software. Powerful motors for both turning and milling deliver outstanding machining capability. The use of ultraprecision pretensioned ballscrews and LM guides produce high accuracy. High-speed positioning of 1,260 ipm reduces cycle times.

The main spindle is a 10-hp, 8,000-rpm built-in motor spindle. The built-in motor provides outstanding acceleration/deceleration. The full C-axis on both main and sub spindles with 0.001-degree position and pneumatic disc brake clamping provide high rigidity for milling operation. The 5HP integral motor synchronous sub spindle allows simultaneous front and back working to be performed.

Powerful live tools sporting 3 hp and 6,000 rpm on the cross mill unit and 1.3 hp and 5,000 rpm on the backend face tools, provide excellent drilling and milling ability. A wide range of milling, drilling, and tapping can be performed. ER-16 collets for the live tools provide excellent rigidity. Rigid tapping is standard.

The synchronous rotary guide bushing features a dual bearing structure with high accuracy. It has strong and accurate bearing support on both ends. The guide bushing is spline shaft driven. The machine can be changed in about 45 minutes to non-guide bushing for short parts, to reduce remnant length, and for use with non-ground bar stock. 

Related Glossary Terms

  • bushing

    bushing

    Cylindrical sleeve, typically made from high-grade tool steel, inserted into a jig fixture to guide cutting tools. There are three main types: renewable, used in liners that in turn are installed in the jig; press-fit, installed directly in the jig for short production runs; and liner (or master), installed permanently in a jig to receive renewable bushing.

  • gang cutting ( milling)

    gang cutting ( milling)

    Machining with several cutters mounted on a single arbor, generally for simultaneous cutting.

  • inches per minute ( ipm)

    inches per minute ( ipm)

    Value that refers to how far the workpiece or cutter advances linearly in 1 minute, defined as: ipm = ipt 5 number of effective teeth 5 rpm. Also known as the table feed or machine feed.

  • lathe

    lathe

    Turning machine capable of sawing, milling, grinding, gear-cutting, drilling, reaming, boring, threading, facing, chamfering, grooving, knurling, spinning, parting, necking, taper-cutting, and cam- and eccentric-cutting, as well as step- and straight-turning. Comes in a variety of forms, ranging from manual to semiautomatic to fully automatic, with major types being engine lathes, turning and contouring lathes, turret lathes and numerical-control lathes. The engine lathe consists of a headstock and spindle, tailstock, bed, carriage (complete with apron) and cross slides. Features include gear- (speed) and feed-selector levers, toolpost, compound rest, lead screw and reversing lead screw, threading dial and rapid-traverse lever. Special lathe types include through-the-spindle, camshaft and crankshaft, brake drum and rotor, spinning and gun-barrel machines. Toolroom and bench lathes are used for precision work; the former for tool-and-die work and similar tasks, the latter for small workpieces (instruments, watches), normally without a power feed. Models are typically designated according to their “swing,” or the largest-diameter workpiece that can be rotated; bed length, or the distance between centers; and horsepower generated. See turning machine.

  • milling

    milling

    Machining operation in which metal or other material is removed by applying power to a rotating cutter. In vertical milling, the cutting tool is mounted vertically on the spindle. In horizontal milling, the cutting tool is mounted horizontally, either directly on the spindle or on an arbor. Horizontal milling is further broken down into conventional milling, where the cutter rotates opposite the direction of feed, or “up” into the workpiece; and climb milling, where the cutter rotates in the direction of feed, or “down” into the workpiece. Milling operations include plane or surface milling, endmilling, facemilling, angle milling, form milling and profiling.

  • milling machine ( mill)

    milling machine ( mill)

    Runs endmills and arbor-mounted milling cutters. Features include a head with a spindle that drives the cutters; a column, knee and table that provide motion in the three Cartesian axes; and a base that supports the components and houses the cutting-fluid pump and reservoir. The work is mounted on the table and fed into the rotating cutter or endmill to accomplish the milling steps; vertical milling machines also feed endmills into the work by means of a spindle-mounted quill. Models range from small manual machines to big bed-type and duplex mills. All take one of three basic forms: vertical, horizontal or convertible horizontal/vertical. Vertical machines may be knee-type (the table is mounted on a knee that can be elevated) or bed-type (the table is securely supported and only moves horizontally). In general, horizontal machines are bigger and more powerful, while vertical machines are lighter but more versatile and easier to set up and operate.

  • tapping

    tapping

    Machining operation in which a tap, with teeth on its periphery, cuts internal threads in a predrilled hole having a smaller diameter than the tap diameter. Threads are formed by a combined rotary and axial-relative motion between tap and workpiece. See tap.

  • turning

    turning

    Workpiece is held in a chuck, mounted on a face plate or secured between centers and rotated while a cutting tool, normally a single-point tool, is fed into it along its periphery or across its end or face. Takes the form of straight turning (cutting along the periphery of the workpiece); taper turning (creating a taper); step turning (turning different-size diameters on the same work); chamfering (beveling an edge or shoulder); facing (cutting on an end); turning threads (usually external but can be internal); roughing (high-volume metal removal); and finishing (final light cuts). Performed on lathes, turning centers, chucking machines, automatic screw machines and similar machines.