Wax Wave Mills

Contact Details

Sumitomo Electric Carbide Inc.
Address
1001 Business Center Dr.
Mt. Prospect
60056
IL
United States
Phone
847-635-0044
Toll Free Phone
800-950-5202
Fax
847-635-7866

42.077619, -87.92063

March 12, 2012

Sumitomo Electric Carbide Inc.'s new WAX Wave Mill Series reduces the costs and time typically associated with rough milling to finishing of non-ferrous materials. Featuring a high-speed and efficient design, WAX Series cutters are in an elite class of endmills. Sumitomo has expanded its milling lineup with the addition of this series.

The WAX Series also boasts a safety-oriented design that prevents tool failure by inhibiting the insert dislodgement that can result from centrifugal force. The diamond-like carbon coating (DLC) applied to WAX inserts promotes adhesion resistance. With these enhancements, the WAX Series offers exceptional ramping and helical milling of aluminum alloys.

Related Glossary Terms

  • alloys

    alloys

    Substances having metallic properties and being composed of two or more chemical elements of which at least one is a metal.

  • aluminum alloys

    aluminum alloys

    Aluminum containing specified quantities of alloying elements added to obtain the necessary mechanical and physical properties. Aluminum alloys are divided into two categories: wrought compositions and casting compositions. Some compositions may contain up to 10 alloying elements, but only one or two are the main alloying elements, such as copper, manganese, silicon, magnesium, zinc or tin.

  • gang cutting ( milling)

    gang cutting ( milling)

    Machining with several cutters mounted on a single arbor, generally for simultaneous cutting.

  • milling

    milling

    Machining operation in which metal or other material is removed by applying power to a rotating cutter. In vertical milling, the cutting tool is mounted vertically on the spindle. In horizontal milling, the cutting tool is mounted horizontally, either directly on the spindle or on an arbor. Horizontal milling is further broken down into conventional milling, where the cutter rotates opposite the direction of feed, or “up” into the workpiece; and climb milling, where the cutter rotates in the direction of feed, or “down” into the workpiece. Milling operations include plane or surface milling, endmilling, facemilling, angle milling, form milling and profiling.

  • milling machine ( mill)

    milling machine ( mill)

    Runs endmills and arbor-mounted milling cutters. Features include a head with a spindle that drives the cutters; a column, knee and table that provide motion in the three Cartesian axes; and a base that supports the components and houses the cutting-fluid pump and reservoir. The work is mounted on the table and fed into the rotating cutter or endmill to accomplish the milling steps; vertical milling machines also feed endmills into the work by means of a spindle-mounted quill. Models range from small manual machines to big bed-type and duplex mills. All take one of three basic forms: vertical, horizontal or convertible horizontal/vertical. Vertical machines may be knee-type (the table is mounted on a knee that can be elevated) or bed-type (the table is securely supported and only moves horizontally). In general, horizontal machines are bigger and more powerful, while vertical machines are lighter but more versatile and easier to set up and operate.