TITANIUM Cut Burs

April 11,2017
TITANIUM Cut Burs

PFERD INC. has introduced TITANIUM cut burs, the latest addition to its high-performance Carbide Bur line-up. TITANIUM cut is specially designed for machining hard titanium alloys (with tensile strength greater than 500 N/mm2). With an innovative tooth geometry, TITANIUM cut generates stock removal rates up to 60% higher than conventional cross-cut burs, according to the company. This results in a smooth milling action with significantly reduced vibrations and noise for comfortable, ergonomic working conditions. TITANIUM cut's superior surface finish and higher metal-removal rates also results in longer tool life and reduced labor costs.

These double-cut burs with facet and chipbreaker generate large, easy to handle chips. Suitable for electric or pneumatic straight grinders and automated equipment, they are finding ready acceptance in the aerospace and defense industries. Applications include milling, chamfering, contouring and weld dressing. And in a variety of other applications including work with structural components, thin-walled tubing in chemical processing and with components requiring extremely high corrosion resistance.

TITANIUM cut burs have a recommended cutting speed range of 850 to 1,500 sfm. They are available in cutting head diameters of 3/8 in. with a 2-1/2 in. length and ½ in. diameter with a 2-3/4 in. length). Both have a shank diameter of ¼ in. Rotational speed is up to 14,000 rpm for the 3/8 in. model and 12,000 rpm for the ½ in. size.

Related Glossary Terms

  • alloys

    alloys

    Substances having metallic properties and being composed of two or more chemical elements of which at least one is a metal.

  • bur

    bur

    Tool-condition problem characterized by the adhesion of small particles of workpiece material to the cutting edge during chip removal.

  • chamfering

    chamfering

    Machining a bevel on a workpiece or tool; improves a tool’s entrance into the cut.

  • chipbreaker

    chipbreaker

    Groove or other tool geometry that breaks chips into small fragments as they come off the workpiece. Designed to prevent chips from becoming so long that they are difficult to control, catch in turning parts and cause safety problems.

  • corrosion resistance

    corrosion resistance

    Ability of an alloy or material to withstand rust and corrosion. These are properties fostered by nickel and chromium in alloys such as stainless steel.

  • cutting speed

    cutting speed

    Tangential velocity on the surface of the tool or workpiece at the cutting interface. The formula for cutting speed (sfm) is tool diameter 5 0.26 5 spindle speed (rpm). The formula for feed per tooth (fpt) is table feed (ipm)/number of flutes/spindle speed (rpm). The formula for spindle speed (rpm) is cutting speed (sfm) 5 3.82/tool diameter. The formula for table feed (ipm) is feed per tooth (ftp) 5 number of tool flutes 5 spindle speed (rpm).

  • dressing

    dressing

    Removal of undesirable materials from “loaded” grinding wheels using a single- or multi-point diamond or other tool. The process also exposes unused, sharp abrasive points. See loading; truing.

  • gang cutting ( milling)

    gang cutting ( milling)

    Machining with several cutters mounted on a single arbor, generally for simultaneous cutting.

  • milling

    milling

    Machining operation in which metal or other material is removed by applying power to a rotating cutter. In vertical milling, the cutting tool is mounted vertically on the spindle. In horizontal milling, the cutting tool is mounted horizontally, either directly on the spindle or on an arbor. Horizontal milling is further broken down into conventional milling, where the cutter rotates opposite the direction of feed, or “up” into the workpiece; and climb milling, where the cutter rotates in the direction of feed, or “down” into the workpiece. Milling operations include plane or surface milling, endmilling, facemilling, angle milling, form milling and profiling.

  • shank

    shank

    Main body of a tool; the portion of a drill or similar end-held tool that fits into a collet, chuck or similar mounting device.

  • tensile strength

    tensile strength

    In tensile testing, the ratio of maximum load to original cross-sectional area. Also called ultimate strength. Compare with yield strength.