Deep dive into fixture plates

Published Date
December 07,2018 - 09:15:am

Related Glossary Terms

  • computer numerical control ( CNC)

    computer numerical control ( CNC)

    Microprocessor-based controller dedicated to a machine tool that permits the creation or modification of parts. Programmed numerical control activates the machine’s servos and spindle drives and controls the various machining operations. See DNC, direct numerical control; NC, numerical control.

  • fixture

    fixture

    Device, often made in-house, that holds a specific workpiece. See jig; modular fixturing.

  • gang cutting ( milling)

    gang cutting ( milling)

    Machining with several cutters mounted on a single arbor, generally for simultaneous cutting.

  • milling

    milling

    Machining operation in which metal or other material is removed by applying power to a rotating cutter. In vertical milling, the cutting tool is mounted vertically on the spindle. In horizontal milling, the cutting tool is mounted horizontally, either directly on the spindle or on an arbor. Horizontal milling is further broken down into conventional milling, where the cutter rotates opposite the direction of feed, or “up” into the workpiece; and climb milling, where the cutter rotates in the direction of feed, or “down” into the workpiece. Milling operations include plane or surface milling, endmilling, facemilling, angle milling, form milling and profiling.

  • milling machine ( mill)

    milling machine ( mill)

    Runs endmills and arbor-mounted milling cutters. Features include a head with a spindle that drives the cutters; a column, knee and table that provide motion in the three Cartesian axes; and a base that supports the components and houses the cutting-fluid pump and reservoir. The work is mounted on the table and fed into the rotating cutter or endmill to accomplish the milling steps; vertical milling machines also feed endmills into the work by means of a spindle-mounted quill. Models range from small manual machines to big bed-type and duplex mills. All take one of three basic forms: vertical, horizontal or convertible horizontal/vertical. Vertical machines may be knee-type (the table is mounted on a knee that can be elevated) or bed-type (the table is securely supported and only moves horizontally). In general, horizontal machines are bigger and more powerful, while vertical machines are lighter but more versatile and easier to set up and operate.

  • modular fixturing

    modular fixturing

In the 18th episode of Cutting Tool Engineering's CNC Chef video series, Bob Warfield of the CNCCookbook delves into setup time savings and other benefits of using fixture plates.

"Fixture Plates can not only save you time," Warfield explains in the video, "they can help you work around the size limitations of your machine’s travel. They’re an excellent addition to any CNC milling machine."

For more information about fixture plates, check out the CNCCookbook blog here.

About The CNC Chef Video Series: The video series is a collaboration between Cutting Tool Engineering and Bob Warfield, founder of the CNCCookbook.com, which is among the most popular CNC Blogs on the Internet. Thanks to his work with CNCCookbook and the G-Wizard software series, Warfield routinely receives questions from shops all over the world. For more information about the CNCCookbook, visit his website here.