Ask The Experts: Indexable Inserts

Published Date
March 21,2022 - 12:30:pm

Cutting Tool Engineering's April 2022 issue includes a feature article about double-sided inserts and high-feed indexable insert milling tools that can help reduce production costs. To supplement this report online, CTE will host a webinar at 10 a.m. (CST) on Wednesday, April 20, titled "Ask The Experts: Indexable Inserts." Robert Bokram, cutting tools product manager with Ceratizit USA will take a deeper dive into recent technological advancements that now allow toolmakers to produce inserts that they "could only dream about in the past." Moderating the webinar will be Keith Jennings, CTE’s long-time Machinist’s Corner columnist and former president of Crow Corp., a family owned machine shop located in Tomball, Texas.

Related Glossary Terms

  • gang cutting ( milling)

    gang cutting ( milling)

    Machining with several cutters mounted on a single arbor, generally for simultaneous cutting.

  • indexable insert

    indexable insert

    Replaceable tool that clamps into a tool body, drill, mill or other cutter body designed to accommodate inserts. Most inserts are made of cemented carbide. Often they are coated with a hard material. Other insert materials are ceramic, cermet, polycrystalline cubic boron nitride and polycrystalline diamond. The insert is used until dull, then indexed, or turned, to expose a fresh cutting edge. When the entire insert is dull, it is usually discarded. Some inserts can be resharpened.

  • milling

    milling

    Machining operation in which metal or other material is removed by applying power to a rotating cutter. In vertical milling, the cutting tool is mounted vertically on the spindle. In horizontal milling, the cutting tool is mounted horizontally, either directly on the spindle or on an arbor. Horizontal milling is further broken down into conventional milling, where the cutter rotates opposite the direction of feed, or “up” into the workpiece; and climb milling, where the cutter rotates in the direction of feed, or “down” into the workpiece. Milling operations include plane or surface milling, endmilling, facemilling, angle milling, form milling and profiling.