Harvey Performance Co. LLC acquires Micro 100 Tool Corp.

Published
March 04,2019 - 10:45am

Micro 100 Tool Corp.Rowley, Massachusetts and Meridian, Idaho – Harvey Performance Company (“Harvey Performance” or the “company”), a provider of specialized cutting tools for precision machining applications through brands Harvey Tool and Helical Solutions, today announced the acquisition of Micro 100. Based in Meridian, Idaho, Micro 100 is a leading innovator in turning tools, specializing in internal boring, grooving and threading tools and milling tools.

Micro 100’s position as a manufacturer of outstanding products in both the turning and milling categories makes it an ideal addition to the Harvey Performance portfolio of brands. Its products provide a strong complement to Harvey Tool’s miniature and specialty profile tooling and Helical Solutions’ high performance end mill selection. Because of this, the addition of Micro 100 significantly increases the company’s market opportunity.

“We are on a journey to assemble and build a world-class company made up of outstanding brands and product lines supported by incredible people,” said Pete Jenkins CEO of Harvey Performance Company. “The addition of Micro 100 products to the Harvey Performance portfolio will help accelerate our ability to do just that. Micro 100 has a demonstrated dedication to quality products, excellent reputation and outstanding service – all traits that are consistent with the Harvey Performance way of doing business.”

“The Harvey Tool and Helical Solutions Brands serve some of the most advanced and demanding end users in the industry,” said Jerry Gleisner, Senior Vice President of Sales for Harvey Performance Company. “Micro 100’s product line, particularly their strong focus in turning tooling, will allow us to offer additional capabilities and value to our distributors and end users.”

Moving forward, the Harvey Performance team will focus on scaling and growing each of the company’s three brands. “We will continue to manufacture Helical Solutions product in our Gorham, Maine facility and Micro 100 product in the Meridian, Idaho location,” said Brian McKahan, Vice President of Operations of the Harvey Performance Company. “We have plans for significant investment and growth across all of our brands.”

The acquisition of Micro 100 better positions Harvey Performance and its brands to compete and grow. “One thing that is a constant in our business is change, with regular consolidation amongst our competitors, our distributors and our end users,” said Jenkins. “We will continue to look to expand our product portfolio through acquisition. Scale matters, and we believe that – through thoughtful assembly of brands and products – we can enhance the end users’ productivity and increasingly earn their business.”

Harvey Performance Company is backed by global growth investor Summit Partners. Jay Pauley, Summit Partners Managing Director and member of the Harvey Performance board, reiterated the strategic importance of this acquisition. “Micro 100 is a growth business with products that complement the Harvey Performance suite extremely well. We are excited to welcome the Micro 100 team to the Harvey Performance Company Family.”

 

 

Related Glossary Terms

  • boring

    boring

    Enlarging a hole that already has been drilled or cored. Generally, it is an operation of truing the previously drilled hole with a single-point, lathe-type tool. Boring is essentially internal turning, in that usually a single-point cutting tool forms the internal shape. Some tools are available with two cutting edges to balance cutting forces.

  • gang cutting ( milling)

    gang cutting ( milling)

    Machining with several cutters mounted on a single arbor, generally for simultaneous cutting.

  • grooving

    grooving

    Machining grooves and shallow channels. Example: grooving ball-bearing raceways. Typically performed by tools that are capable of light cuts at high feed rates. Imparts high-quality finish.

  • milling

    milling

    Machining operation in which metal or other material is removed by applying power to a rotating cutter. In vertical milling, the cutting tool is mounted vertically on the spindle. In horizontal milling, the cutting tool is mounted horizontally, either directly on the spindle or on an arbor. Horizontal milling is further broken down into conventional milling, where the cutter rotates opposite the direction of feed, or “up” into the workpiece; and climb milling, where the cutter rotates in the direction of feed, or “down” into the workpiece. Milling operations include plane or surface milling, endmilling, facemilling, angle milling, form milling and profiling.

  • milling machine ( mill)

    milling machine ( mill)

    Runs endmills and arbor-mounted milling cutters. Features include a head with a spindle that drives the cutters; a column, knee and table that provide motion in the three Cartesian axes; and a base that supports the components and houses the cutting-fluid pump and reservoir. The work is mounted on the table and fed into the rotating cutter or endmill to accomplish the milling steps; vertical milling machines also feed endmills into the work by means of a spindle-mounted quill. Models range from small manual machines to big bed-type and duplex mills. All take one of three basic forms: vertical, horizontal or convertible horizontal/vertical. Vertical machines may be knee-type (the table is mounted on a knee that can be elevated) or bed-type (the table is securely supported and only moves horizontally). In general, horizontal machines are bigger and more powerful, while vertical machines are lighter but more versatile and easier to set up and operate.

  • precision machining ( precision measurement)

    precision machining ( precision measurement)

    Machining and measuring to exacting standards. Four basic considerations are: dimensions, or geometrical characteristics such as lengths, angles and diameters of which the sizes are numerically specified; limits, or the maximum and minimum sizes permissible for a specified dimension; tolerances, or the total permissible variations in size; and allowances, or the prescribed differences in dimensions between mating parts.

  • threading

    threading

    Process of both external (e.g., thread milling) and internal (e.g., tapping, thread milling) cutting, turning and rolling of threads into particular material. Standardized specifications are available to determine the desired results of the threading process. Numerous thread-series designations are written for specific applications. Threading often is performed on a lathe. Specifications such as thread height are critical in determining the strength of the threads. The material used is taken into consideration in determining the expected results of any particular application for that threaded piece. In external threading, a calculated depth is required as well as a particular angle to the cut. To perform internal threading, the exact diameter to bore the hole is critical before threading. The threads are distinguished from one another by the amount of tolerance and/or allowance that is specified. See turning.

  • turning

    turning

    Workpiece is held in a chuck, mounted on a face plate or secured between centers and rotated while a cutting tool, normally a single-point tool, is fed into it along its periphery or across its end or face. Takes the form of straight turning (cutting along the periphery of the workpiece); taper turning (creating a taper); step turning (turning different-size diameters on the same work); chamfering (beveling an edge or shoulder); facing (cutting on an end); turning threads (usually external but can be internal); roughing (high-volume metal removal); and finishing (final light cuts). Performed on lathes, turning centers, chucking machines, automatic screw machines and similar machines.