CGTech and Makino renew partnership

Published
October 16, 2020 - 06:45am
CGTech and Makino renew partnership

CGTech, the developer of Vericut software, and Makino Milling Machine Co. Ltd., a manufacturer of high-precision CNC machine tools technology, renewed a strategic corporate partnership. Makino and CGTech have worked together for more than 30 years to provide manufacturing and design solutions to manufacturers around the globe.

Vericut’s simulation software helps users detect errors, potential collisions, or areas of inefficiency. Makino offers a wide range of metal cutting and EDM technology.

“We are excited about this ongoing partnership,” said CGTech president Jon Prun. “Manufacturers who buy Makino machines have invested in world-leading machinery. Our aim is to offer a software solution designed to help purchasers of Makino machines get up and running quickly, while protecting their investment in the long term.”

Makino president Shinichi Inoue said that simulation software is important to the company. “Makino uses Vericut in simulations, and maintains an indispensable cooperative relationship with CGTech to help promote advancements to digital twins in the future," he said.

For more information on Makino products, phone 513-573-7200 or visit www.makino.com. For more information on Vericut, phone 949-753-1050 or visit cgtech.com.

Related Glossary Terms

  • computer numerical control ( CNC)

    computer numerical control ( CNC)

    Microprocessor-based controller dedicated to a machine tool that permits the creation or modification of parts. Programmed numerical control activates the machine’s servos and spindle drives and controls the various machining operations. See DNC, direct numerical control; NC, numerical control.

  • electrical-discharge machining ( EDM)

    electrical-discharge machining ( EDM)

    Process that vaporizes conductive materials by controlled application of pulsed electrical current that flows between a workpiece and electrode (tool) in a dielectric fluid. Permits machining shapes to tight accuracies without the internal stresses conventional machining often generates. Useful in diemaking.

  • gang cutting ( milling)

    gang cutting ( milling)

    Machining with several cutters mounted on a single arbor, generally for simultaneous cutting.

  • milling

    milling

    Machining operation in which metal or other material is removed by applying power to a rotating cutter. In vertical milling, the cutting tool is mounted vertically on the spindle. In horizontal milling, the cutting tool is mounted horizontally, either directly on the spindle or on an arbor. Horizontal milling is further broken down into conventional milling, where the cutter rotates opposite the direction of feed, or “up” into the workpiece; and climb milling, where the cutter rotates in the direction of feed, or “down” into the workpiece. Milling operations include plane or surface milling, endmilling, facemilling, angle milling, form milling and profiling.

  • milling machine ( mill)

    milling machine ( mill)

    Runs endmills and arbor-mounted milling cutters. Features include a head with a spindle that drives the cutters; a column, knee and table that provide motion in the three Cartesian axes; and a base that supports the components and houses the cutting-fluid pump and reservoir. The work is mounted on the table and fed into the rotating cutter or endmill to accomplish the milling steps; vertical milling machines also feed endmills into the work by means of a spindle-mounted quill. Models range from small manual machines to big bed-type and duplex mills. All take one of three basic forms: vertical, horizontal or convertible horizontal/vertical. Vertical machines may be knee-type (the table is mounted on a knee that can be elevated) or bed-type (the table is securely supported and only moves horizontally). In general, horizontal machines are bigger and more powerful, while vertical machines are lighter but more versatile and easier to set up and operate.

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