Röhm Products of America Inc. appoints sales manager

Published
June 26,2018 - 07:30pm
George Burleson

To further support Midwestern customers, clamping and gripping provider Röhm Products of America Inc., Suwanee, Georgia, appointed George Burleson to manage sales of the company’s products in the Illinois and Wisconsin territories. In this role, he will hold responsibility for supporting the company’s efforts to provide chucks, centers, vises, tool clamping and automation systems as well as customized solutions for turning, milling, drilling and grinding to customers across the region.

“We are thrilled to welcome George to the team and are confident he will help our customers implement the high-productivity, high-quality workholding solutions for which RÖHM is well-known,” said Steven Onik, national sales manager for RÖHM.

Burleson brings a significant understanding of the cutting tool industry to RÖHM after spending more than three years as the technical sales manager for the Rowley, Massachusetts-based Harvey Tool Company LLC, where he has worked in various positions since 2012. In his sales management position, he achieved constant year-over-year growth while managing relationships with distributors and customers in the medical, aerospace, defense, plastic injection molding and technology manufacturing industries. Prior to joining Harvey Tool, he earned his Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering at Union College in Schenectady, New York, and studied Chinese during a term abroad at Fudan University in Shanghai.

Related Glossary Terms

  • centers

    centers

    Cone-shaped pins that support a workpiece by one or two ends during machining. The centers fit into holes drilled in the workpiece ends. Centers that turn with the workpiece are called “live” centers; those that do not are called “dead” centers.

  • gang cutting ( milling)

    gang cutting ( milling)

    Machining with several cutters mounted on a single arbor, generally for simultaneous cutting.

  • grinding

    grinding

    Machining operation in which material is removed from the workpiece by a powered abrasive wheel, stone, belt, paste, sheet, compound, slurry, etc. Takes various forms: surface grinding (creates flat and/or squared surfaces); cylindrical grinding (for external cylindrical and tapered shapes, fillets, undercuts, etc.); centerless grinding; chamfering; thread and form grinding; tool and cutter grinding; offhand grinding; lapping and polishing (grinding with extremely fine grits to create ultrasmooth surfaces); honing; and disc grinding.

  • milling

    milling

    Machining operation in which metal or other material is removed by applying power to a rotating cutter. In vertical milling, the cutting tool is mounted vertically on the spindle. In horizontal milling, the cutting tool is mounted horizontally, either directly on the spindle or on an arbor. Horizontal milling is further broken down into conventional milling, where the cutter rotates opposite the direction of feed, or “up” into the workpiece; and climb milling, where the cutter rotates in the direction of feed, or “down” into the workpiece. Milling operations include plane or surface milling, endmilling, facemilling, angle milling, form milling and profiling.

  • turning

    turning

    Workpiece is held in a chuck, mounted on a face plate or secured between centers and rotated while a cutting tool, normally a single-point tool, is fed into it along its periphery or across its end or face. Takes the form of straight turning (cutting along the periphery of the workpiece); taper turning (creating a taper); step turning (turning different-size diameters on the same work); chamfering (beveling an edge or shoulder); facing (cutting on an end); turning threads (usually external but can be internal); roughing (high-volume metal removal); and finishing (final light cuts). Performed on lathes, turning centers, chucking machines, automatic screw machines and similar machines.