GWS Tool Group acquires custom tool manufacturer

Published
February 03,2021 - 05:00am
GWS Tool Group acquires custom tool manufacturer

Taurus operates a 25,000-sq.-ft. facility outfitted with CNC grinding and inspection equipment.GWS Tool Group in Tavares, Florida, has acquired Taurus Tool & Engineering. Taurus is the first acquisition in 2021 for GWS Tool Group, following three previous acquisitions in 2020.

Located near Batavia, Illinois, Taurus manufactures precision custom cutting tools, primarily in the categories of both HSS and carbide hole making and milling tools. The company’s product capability includes complex HSS and carbide step tools for aerospace and automotive applications, custom thread-on modular tooling and combination tools for the elimination of multi-tool operations.

The company operates from a 25,000-sq.-ft. facility outfitted with CNC grinding and inspection equipment. According to GWS, problem resolution at the spindle has been instrumental in the company’s growth, and has helped Taurus become a leader in high-quality complex round tool solutions.

Solid Carbide Coolant-Fed Step Reamer“Taurus Tool & Engineering is an obvious match and fit for our organization,” said Rick McIntyre, GWS’ CEO. “On the carbide side, they bring a host of complimentary skill sets to our organization, while bolting on new capability in the areas of high-speed tools and custom modular tooling technology know-how.

"Previously, GWS has had to bypass certain niches like HSS tooling, and now we can offer our customers and partners in distribution another reason to consolidate with GWS.”

For more information on GWS products, phone 877-497-8665 or visit www.GWSToolGroup.com.

Related Glossary Terms

  • computer numerical control ( CNC)

    computer numerical control ( CNC)

    Microprocessor-based controller dedicated to a machine tool that permits the creation or modification of parts. Programmed numerical control activates the machine’s servos and spindle drives and controls the various machining operations. See DNC, direct numerical control; NC, numerical control.

  • gang cutting ( milling)

    gang cutting ( milling)

    Machining with several cutters mounted on a single arbor, generally for simultaneous cutting.

  • grinding

    grinding

    Machining operation in which material is removed from the workpiece by a powered abrasive wheel, stone, belt, paste, sheet, compound, slurry, etc. Takes various forms: surface grinding (creates flat and/or squared surfaces); cylindrical grinding (for external cylindrical and tapered shapes, fillets, undercuts, etc.); centerless grinding; chamfering; thread and form grinding; tool and cutter grinding; offhand grinding; lapping and polishing (grinding with extremely fine grits to create ultrasmooth surfaces); honing; and disc grinding.

  • high-speed steels ( HSS)

    high-speed steels ( HSS)

    Available in two major types: tungsten high-speed steels (designated by letter T having tungsten as the principal alloying element) and molybdenum high-speed steels (designated by letter M having molybdenum as the principal alloying element). The type T high-speed steels containing cobalt have higher wear resistance and greater red (hot) hardness, withstanding cutting temperature up to 1,100º F (590º C). The type T steels are used to fabricate metalcutting tools (milling cutters, drills, reamers and taps), woodworking tools, various types of punches and dies, ball and roller bearings. The type M steels are used for cutting tools and various types of dies.

  • milling

    milling

    Machining operation in which metal or other material is removed by applying power to a rotating cutter. In vertical milling, the cutting tool is mounted vertically on the spindle. In horizontal milling, the cutting tool is mounted horizontally, either directly on the spindle or on an arbor. Horizontal milling is further broken down into conventional milling, where the cutter rotates opposite the direction of feed, or “up” into the workpiece; and climb milling, where the cutter rotates in the direction of feed, or “down” into the workpiece. Milling operations include plane or surface milling, endmilling, facemilling, angle milling, form milling and profiling.

  • modular tooling

    modular tooling

    1. Tooling system comprised of standardized tools and toolholders. 2. Devices that allow rapid mounting and replacement of tools. Commonly used with carousel toolchangers and other computerized machining operations. See toolchanger; toolholder.