Ceratizit moves U.S. headquarters

Published
September 22,2022 - 07:00am
Ceratizit opens new headquarters

To centralize operations and continue to better serve its customers, tooling supplier Ceratizit USA, Inc. has shifted its official U.S. headquarters from Warren, Mich., to the company’s Schaumburg, Ill., facility.

Ceratizit acquired the Schaumburg facility when it absorbed the Komet tooling brand name and product line under the Ceratizit Group umbrella.

Ceratizit USA offers a full-range product portfolio that spans 65,000 tooling products specifically focused on the needs of U.S. manufacturers. Under the name Team Cutting Tools, the portfolio includes solutions from Ceratizit as well as tooling under the Komet, WNT, and Klenk brand names. Ceratizit USA engineers and manufactures highly specialized, precision cutting tools for drilling, boring, reaming, milling, and turning.

“Ceratizit is not just a tooling supplier,” said Mirko Merlo, President of the Americas for Ceratizit Group. “We are a reliable partner with more than a century of experience and extensive industry and engineering knowledge. Because we encompass the Ceratizit, Komet, WNT, and Klenk tooling brands and technologies, we can provide complete tooling solutions and localized support that allow our customers in industries such as aerospace, automotive, oil, and gas, medical, and transportation to increase their production output.”

In addition to its new headquarters, Ceratizit USA maintains two other facilities within the United States. Ceratizit Sacramento, LP is focused on manufacturing solid carbide round tools and micro tools located in Rancho Cordova, Calif., and the other facility is the company’s main logistics center in Towanda, Penn.

Related Glossary Terms

  • boring

    boring

    Enlarging a hole that already has been drilled or cored. Generally, it is an operation of truing the previously drilled hole with a single-point, lathe-type tool. Boring is essentially internal turning, in that usually a single-point cutting tool forms the internal shape. Some tools are available with two cutting edges to balance cutting forces.

  • gang cutting ( milling)

    gang cutting ( milling)

    Machining with several cutters mounted on a single arbor, generally for simultaneous cutting.

  • milling

    milling

    Machining operation in which metal or other material is removed by applying power to a rotating cutter. In vertical milling, the cutting tool is mounted vertically on the spindle. In horizontal milling, the cutting tool is mounted horizontally, either directly on the spindle or on an arbor. Horizontal milling is further broken down into conventional milling, where the cutter rotates opposite the direction of feed, or “up” into the workpiece; and climb milling, where the cutter rotates in the direction of feed, or “down” into the workpiece. Milling operations include plane or surface milling, endmilling, facemilling, angle milling, form milling and profiling.

  • turning

    turning

    Workpiece is held in a chuck, mounted on a face plate or secured between centers and rotated while a cutting tool, normally a single-point tool, is fed into it along its periphery or across its end or face. Takes the form of straight turning (cutting along the periphery of the workpiece); taper turning (creating a taper); step turning (turning different-size diameters on the same work); chamfering (beveling an edge or shoulder); facing (cutting on an end); turning threads (usually external but can be internal); roughing (high-volume metal removal); and finishing (final light cuts). Performed on lathes, turning centers, chucking machines, automatic screw machines and similar machines.