Home
(Click to learn more)
Home Subscribe Media Kit Reports Buyers Guide Events Resources Classifieds Contacts Ad Index
(Click to learn more)























AutomationAbrasivesCleaning/
Cleaning Equip.
Cutting ToolsCoatingsCoolantFixtures, WorkholdingGrindingGrinding DocMachine TechnologyMachine ToolsMachine Tools
Accessories/
Controls
Machining Operations, CuttingMachining Operations, RelatedMachinist CornerManagementManagers DeskMaterialsPart TimeProductive TimesQuality ControlSoftwareToolholding2013 Buyers GuideEmail Newsletter Signup

Supplement  
 
(Click to learn more)












Project runway produces academic, industry partnership

Clemson University researchers redesigned and modified a mobile drill press to retrofit a section of a runway that halts overrun aircraft, ultimately minimizing aircraft damage and passenger injury, the university reported today.

The process of retrofitting the end of a runway at Greenville Downtown Airport required more than 80,000 holes to be drilled in the concrete, according to the university, which is located in Clemson, S.C.

Tackling the runway project was Pace Pavement Technologies Inc., which recognized that manually drilling the holes was not an option and there needed to be a more efficient and accurate way to drill.

“We visited several machine shops and pneumatic suppliers and received minimal assistance in the design and build of a mobile drill press,” said Carl Pace, president of Pace Pavement Technologies Inc. “Clemson University stepped up to the challenge and enjoyed taking on this project.”

Seven Clemson University student researchers and their faculty adviser met with representatives from Pace Pavement Technologies Inc. to discuss the design problems and challenges related to their mobile drill press.

“We needed to reduce the weight of the machine by half so as to not cause any damage to the pavement underneath,” Pace said.

The students began by redesigning the undercarriage and modifying the wheels to evenly spread the weight of the machine and reduce ground pressure, the university reported.

“Clemson University student researchers truly went above and beyond their call of duty by not only reducing the ground pressure of the mobile drill press, but also improving the machine's overall performance and maneuverability,” said Gregory Mocko, an assistant professor in Clemson’s mechanical engineering department.

The students were able to improve the overall performance of the machine by altering the plumbing, developing a gauge to adjust each drill simultaneously and adding a device that allows the operator to better control drill depth.


List all Industry News items.

View all featured advertisers.

                        
  

Copyright 1995-2014. Cutting Tool Engineering. All rights reserved.